Florida Sportsman September 2012


Subscribe to Florida Sportsman Magazine


Contents

Snook season reopens on Florida’s Atlantic coast September 1. It’s always a tricky time of year to catch those post-spawn fish as they leave the confines of ocean inlets and spread to offshore reefs and Intracoastal haunts. Writer Peter Slis, a regular on the Indian River Lagoon, taps the expertise of fellow snookers to put together 4 game-plans for catching fall snook. Gulf Coast anglers (and those in Monroe County, which follows Florida’s Gulf-side snook seasons) will have to be satisfied with catch-and-release snook action until next fall (2013). Magazine Founder Karl Wickstrom and Contributing Editor Doug Kelly, in Openers and Conservation Front, shine some light on the controversial decision to keep the Gulf side closed.

 

 

 

 

 


Inshore

Snook may get harder to catch in September, but not redfish. As summer draws to a close, maturing redfish in the 30-inch class begin to leave the estuaries and join schools of monster breeder reds in open water. Along Florida’s Panhandle coast, anglers out of Pensacola are dialed in to this fishery, as reported by Ed Mashburn. Find out when the fish will arrive, how to locate them, how to catch them, and how to enjoy the action while ensuring the fish continue to return in big numbers season after season. We cover another major inshore rod-bender in this issue: Associate Editor Sam Hudson gives a concise look at Florida Keys-style shark fishing on the flats, in the Inshore Seminar.

 


Offshore

Let’s put some great-eating mangrove snapper in the box, and let’s do in the cool of night! It’s a late-summer tradition, anchoring on the reefs off the Florida coasts and setting out baits for plump mangrove, or gray, snapper. But it’s also a pursuit fraught with potential peril. Managing Editor David Conway looks out for your safety and satisfaction in a terrific feature article this month. The story is based out of Fort Pierce, but the snapper techniques and navigation advice are relevant anywhere in the state. In the Offshore Seminar, Rick Ryals presents a tutorial for making up quick, stealthy dropper rigs. Bait up with a hunk of squid, cut fish or shrimp, and add seabass and triggerfish to your dinner menu.

 


Hunting and Freshwater

Florida’s early hunting seasons, including Archery and Muzzleloading, are apt to open under 80-degree daytime heat. That puts a premium on comfortable camouflage. Chris Christian offers some hints on dressing for the weather, and gives sage advice on picking the best camo pattern for the game at hand. Some days, that’s no camo at all—hot orange for safety during General Gun seasons. On the freshwater rivers, writer Ed Mashburn catches up with the catfish hunters from North Florida, guys who stay up all night trying to bag 30-pound flathead and blue catfish. Learn their secrets for locating big fish, and find out what Florida fisheries officials are planning for this unusual, burgeoning fishery.

 


Conservation

Gulf Coast anglers aren’t all happy about the FWC decision to keep the snook season closed on that side. Karl Wickstrom proposes an easy way out of the Snook Imbroglio, including simplified seasons, bag limits and slot limits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Previous Issues:

2012

Florida Sportsman August 2012

Florida Sportsman July 2012

– Florida Sportsman June 2012

Florida Sportsman May 2012

Florida Sportsman April 2012

Florida Sportsman March 2012

Florida Sportsman February 2012

Florida Sportsman January 2012

2011

Florida Sportsman December 2011

Florida Sportsman November 2011

Florida Sportsman October 2011

Florida Sportsman September 2011


Subscribe to Florida Sportsman Magazine


This entry was posted in Florida Keys Fishing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.
  • Recent Posts

  • Contact Us



  • Facebook page for the War Bird Sportfishing Charter Boat Twitter Account for Captain Dana Banks - Key Largo Fishing Guide and Charter Boat Captain of the War Bird RSS Feed for Posts from Captain Dana Banks - Key Largo Fishing Charters - the War Bird
    Google Plus

    To Book a Deep Sea
    Fishing Charter
    (305) 394-7420

    Florida Keys Fishing in Key Largo


  • To Book The War Bird
    (305) 394-7420


    KEY LARGO
    DEEP SEA FISHING
    • Sailfish
    • Dolphin - Mahi Mahi
    • Wahoo
    • King Mackerel
    • Tuna - Black Fin Tuna
    • Marlin
    KEYS REEF &
    WRECK FISHING

    • Yellowtail Snapper
    • Mutton Snapper
    • Cubera Snapper
    • Mangrove Snapper
    • Grouper
    • Kingfish - King Mackerel
    • Spanish and Cero Mackerel
    • Hogfish
    • Amberjack
    • Cobia
    • Baracuda

  • The Fish House
    Key Largo's Finest Seafood Restaurant
    102401 Overseas Hwy
    Key Largo, FL 33037
    305-451-4665

    Lunch: 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
    Dinner: 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.
    No Reservations, just come on in!


  • Pages

  • Meta


  • Offshore Sportfishing in the Florida Keys

  • Tags


  • Facebook page for the War Bird Sportfishing Charter Boat Twitter Account for Captain Dana Banks - Key Largo Fishing Guide and Charter Boat Captain of the War Bird RSS Feed for Posts from Captain Dana Banks - Key Largo Fishing Charters - the War Bird

    To Book a Deep Sea
    Fishing Charter
    (305) 394-7420