Allowable dolphin harvest likely to increase

Federal fishery managers want to hear from Florida Keys fishermen Thursday on possible changes to dolphin and kingfish harvests.

Staff with the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council hold an open session from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Key Largo Hilton at mile marker 97 bayside.

Comments will be recorded on “proposed management measures affecting fishery management plans” for snapper and grouper, dolphin and wahoo, coral, and coastal migratory pelagics including kingfish, Spanish mackerel and cobia.

Using a revised catch-survey technique, the South Atlantic staff is recommending an increase in the annual harvest of dolphin fish, also known as mahi mahi. The recreational catch dolphin would rise to 14.2 million pounds from 13.5 million pounds.

Federal rules allocate 92.5 percent of the dolphin harvest to the recreational sector, with commercial-fishing vessels eligible to take 7.5 percent, which would be increased to 1.16 million pounds under the favored alternative.

The Keys do not have a significant commercial fishery for dolphin.

Allowable harvests were revised by applying the new Marine Recreational Information Program, which largely replaces the much-criticized Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey that relied on a more limited volume of information.

Keys commercial fishermen will appeal for a change in rules on transporting mackerel, said Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association executive Bill Kelly.

A spring season when kingfish can only be caught in an area off Collier County bans Keys-based boats from bringing their catch back to Key West or Marathon, or even to wholesale docks in Fort Myers or Everglades City, he said.

“We’re asking for the authority to bring our catch back to Monroe County,” he said.

Hook-and-line commercial fishermen also want to have their daily limit of kingfish raised from 1,250 fish to 3,000, currently the limit allowed farther up the East Coast.

That rule, imposed to protect kingfish from being overfished as incidental catch by yellowtail fishermen, has been rendered obsolete by improved fishing techniques, Kelly said.

For more information, go to www.safmc.net. Comments can be submitted through the site.

This entry was posted in Florida Keys Fishing and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.
  • Recent Posts

  • Contact Us



  • Facebook page for the War Bird Sportfishing Charter Boat Twitter Account for Captain Dana Banks - Key Largo Fishing Guide and Charter Boat Captain of the War Bird RSS Feed for Posts from Captain Dana Banks - Key Largo Fishing Charters - the War Bird
    Google Plus

    To Book a Deep Sea
    Fishing Charter
    (305) 394-7420

    Florida Keys Fishing in Key Largo


  • To Book The War Bird
    (305) 394-7420


    KEY LARGO
    DEEP SEA FISHING
    • Sailfish
    • Dolphin - Mahi Mahi
    • Wahoo
    • King Mackerel
    • Tuna - Black Fin Tuna
    • Marlin
    KEYS REEF &
    WRECK FISHING

    • Yellowtail Snapper
    • Mutton Snapper
    • Cubera Snapper
    • Mangrove Snapper
    • Grouper
    • Kingfish - King Mackerel
    • Spanish and Cero Mackerel
    • Hogfish
    • Amberjack
    • Cobia
    • Baracuda

  • The Fish House
    Key Largo's Finest Seafood Restaurant
    102401 Overseas Hwy
    Key Largo, FL 33037
    305-451-4665

    Lunch: 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
    Dinner: 4 p.m. - 10 p.m.
    No Reservations, just come on in!


  • Pages

  • Meta


  • Offshore Sportfishing in the Florida Keys

  • Tags


  • Facebook page for the War Bird Sportfishing Charter Boat Twitter Account for Captain Dana Banks - Key Largo Fishing Guide and Charter Boat Captain of the War Bird RSS Feed for Posts from Captain Dana Banks - Key Largo Fishing Charters - the War Bird

    To Book a Deep Sea
    Fishing Charter
    (305) 394-7420